​​​​​Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow

Brunfelsia grandiflora

  • Common Name: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (other common names are: Raintree, Morning, Noon, and Night, Kiss Me Quick and the Spanish name Chiricsanango)
  • Scientific Name: Brunfelsia grandiflora
  • Family Name: Solanaceae
  • Origin: Brazilian Rainforests
  • Height: 7’ – 10’
  • Width: 5’– 8’
  • Growth: Moderate        
  • Zone: 9B - 11
  • Light Needs: Partial shade – part sun, will bloom in either.
  • Salt Tolerance:  Moderate
  • Soil/PH/Texture: Likes sand, loam, and clay soils. This plant is well adapted to a variety of well drained soils, acid, or alkaline.
  • Soil Moisture: Wet – somewhat moist,  needs a regular watering to survive but not saturated.
  • Drought Tolerance: Moderate and is humidity tolerant.
  • Pests/Diseases: No serious pests are normally seen on this plant. Very few problems seem to affect this nice shrub.
  • Growing Conditions: Easy maintenance, trim lightly if it needs it after a bloom cycle and you can do a harder pruning back in the spring for growth. Fertilize 3 times a year with a decent granular fertilizer also you can supplement feedings with bloom boosters such as bone meal.
  • Characteristics: This evergreen beauty that is a part of the nightshade family (Solanaceae),  has green simple leaves that are arranged alternately, oblong in shape, with pinnate venation. The gorgeous and showy 1” – 2” blooms of deep violet, turn to soft lavender, and then to white. It blooms all year, but even more so in the winter.
  • Propagation: Tip cuttings.
  • Wildlife: Attracts butterflies.
  • Facts: It is known to be used in traditional medicine to treat rheumatism, fever, arthritis, and syphilis. It is one of the major active plant additives that contributes to the hallucinogenic effects of the drink ayahuasca in South America. Lab tests proved that the extracts of the plant were active against the protozoa that cause leishmaniasis. Keep in mind that this plant contains toxic alkaloids within its berries/fruit that if ingested by horses, cats, dogs, or humans is dangerous. Its leaves are poisonous too, but the berries and fruit are most toxic.
  • Designer Considerations: Used as a specimen, accent, border, foundation, mass planting, screen, along a fence, walkway or driveway. It can also make a great patio or plant in a container on your deck. There are many great places to show off this plant.​​

Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow

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